Logistic identity
Client: De Kunstrijders
A multifunctional identity system for the Amsterdam based fine art transportation company, De Kunstrijders. From a business card that also functions as a tracking tag to a letterhead that can be transformed into different types of documents.
Business card and envelope that contains the card

Letterpress business card with identical unique numbering system. Once ripped, the business card functions as a tracking tag; lower part as proof of sending and upper part to be attached to art work. 

Blank letterhead and invoice

Letterhead becomes an invoice with laser printed information (right).

Blank bill of lading

Blank bill of lading 

Bill of lading with laser printed information

Bill of lading with laser printed information (laser printed typography by De Kunstrijder), each part intended for a different party: Sender, receiver, pick-up address, and logistic company.

Transportation truck with icons and lettering

Icons and lettering for transportation truck.

Business and personal stationery
Client: Frank van Wijk, Ireen van Ditshuyzen
This stationery system solution was to meet a unique set of criteria: For two individuals, each with two different addresses, both for personal and professional use, totaling eight usages.
Through different print runs, use of perforation and die cuts, various sticker labels, eight different stationeries came to being based on one idea.
Letterhead, front and back
Die cut Letterhead, front and back
Letterhead, close up
Envelope with letter
Architectural identity
Client: Peter Sas Architecten
A minimalistic identity system with thoughtful details in subtle color combination of black and warm gray. The identity reflected the architecture bureau’s refined and sophisticated work.
Business card, front and back

Business card printed with 1:1 scale centimeter ruler; this was used by the architects to check their architectural plans during onsite construction control.

Letterhead
Letterhead close up

Business information printed on the back is seen through the thin paper to give off the sense of a third dimension.

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